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June 2015 Archives

A win-win deal in a paternity lawsuit

In Texas, and all across the United States, there are men who are being forced to pay child support for children who are not biologically theirs. And there are men who would welcome the opportunity if it means receiving recognition that they are in fact the father of their child. In either case, the man will benefit from a knowledgeable attorney, who can help to ensure that the outcome of the case is as favorable as possible.

What is needed for a child support order modification?

Any divorce, whether it is in Texas or anywhere in the United States, takes a toll on the children. While their parents can at least look forward to a brighter future ahead, the children are often gripped by insecurity. Hence, in the best interest of a child, the Texas court generally orders one parent to have custody of the child. Child support is then typically paid by the non-custodial parent. It is important to understand that child support is mandatory, not optional.

Why is Texas adopting the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act?

Child support and alimony recipients in Plano County and in the rest of Texas might be aware that Texas has its own set of laws when it comes to family law matters. However, in cases where the person is having a child support or alimony agreement issue in a different state, enforcing the order may be a challenge. In order to address these types of issues, Congress has made it mandatory for states to adopt the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act, which was published by the Uniform Law Commission.

Divorce-related questions that come up-Part II

Texas residents may agree that divorce can be a complicated situation. In fact, the entire divorce process may take a long time and it can potentially get unpleasant. In an earlier post, it was stated that Texas is a no-fault divorce state. That means that a person does not necessarily have to prove that the other spouse was at fault in order to obtain a divorce.

Legal intervention may be necessary in child support cases

Many Texas residents would agree that divorce matters become more complex when they involve children. Typically, children are slower to come to terms with a divorce because they still want their parents to be together. In the best interest of the children, a Texas court gives custody to one parent and orders the other to pay child support, which is mandatory in Texas. Very often, the amount of child support is a divorce issue that is hotly disputed.

Child support payments in Texas-Part II

As many Texas residents may agree, children are often the people who are affected the most in a divorce. Although their parents are excited about breaking the matrimonial bond, children often feel helpless and insecure. Children often worry about their future and have many questions, including with whom they will live and who will support them financially. With the best interest of the child in mind at all times, the courts very often order one parent to pay child support and the other parent to have custody of the child.

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Gunnstaks Law Office
5601 Granite Parkway, Suite 350
Plano, TX 75024

Phone: 972-590-6572
Phone: 972-392-2300
Fax: 214-619-0636
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