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Filmmaker too busy to share royalties with ex-wife

| Sep 20, 2018 | Divorce |

Acclaimed documentary filmmaker Michael Moore is famous for such films as “Bowling for Columbine” and “Fahrenheit 9/11.” He generally projects an anti-capitalist or left-leaning political point of view tinged with a flair for comedy.

Yet the Academy Award winner is less interested in sharing his films’ royalties with his ex-wife Kathleen Glynn, who was married to him from 1991-2014. Glynn, who is a film and television producer and writer, worked with her ex-husband on many of his defining projects including Moore’s breakthrough “Roger & Me” from 1989.

Not honoring the divorce agreement

ccording to Glynn, Moore has failed to provide royalties that was part of a confidential divorce settlement mutually agreed upon through arbitration in 2014. In that agreement, Glynn released all claims to income from Moore’s past works in exchange for a 4 percent share of royalties on those works for five years following the 2014 agreement.

Stalling and roadblocks

With no apparent financial motivation to settle, Moore showed little interest in finalizing the agreement and pled that he was too busy to take part in the mediation, which dragged on for months. The couple then switched to another arbiter where Moore completed three days of testimony before claiming he had no more time.

Back to square one?

Glynn now seeks a court order that forces Moore to continue arbitration in front of the initial arbiter. This is a prime example of one side showing little interest in resolving a dispute.

Stalling is a tactic, but it seldom works in favor of those doing it. Not only does it avoid closure, but it increases the cost of reaching an agreement. Eventually this matter will be settled, but those who make the ruling could take umbrage to these tactics and potentially punish those not negotiating good faith regardless of who they are.

An experienced Board-certified family law expert attorney can provide useful guidance throughout this process here in Texas, helping to ensure that your rights are protected and that the agreement is an equitable one even when it involves serious complications.

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